Kosher, Tahor, Qadosh

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3 Responses

  1. Len Moskowitz says:

    If I have it correct, “ka-doshe” is about making it possible to approach God’s holy presence in the Mikdash/Mishkan, and for God’s presence to allow for our approach. And while a non-Jew may approach the Mikdash to the level of the Kheil and is not required to be ta-hore to be allowed there, a Jew who is ta-mei from something related to the state of his/her body is excluded from the Kheil. Interestingly, a Jew who is ta-mei from contact with a dead body either has the same limits as a non-Jew (d’rabbanan), or could enter a little further (d’o-raita). This is based on the potential for k’doosha specific to having the status of a Yisrael, either by birth or via conversion by a legal Beit Din.

    Keeping kosher is one of the mitz-vote. The mitzvote are how we get to the state of k’doosha, as evidenced by the b’rakha we associate with doing a mitzva: it includes the phrase: “ah-sheir kid-sha-noo b’mitz-vo-tahv”.

  2. Raffi says:

    The wedding formula, “Hereby you are mequdeshes li…, committed to me…” uses the term where the “to” isn’t Hashem’ purpose. But in usual usage, if the “le-” is not provided, it means creation’s Ultimate Purpose, “for My Honor, lekhvodi, I have created it”.

    Huh?

    • micha says:

      You should see the quoted post to see more about how I’m taking qedushah and taharah. I didn’t try to start from scratch here.

      Qedushah refers to commitment. Therefore, the preposition it takes is “le-“. Something or someone could be set aside for any specific purpose. A woman getting married is committing herself to her husband. And so the formula is “mequdeshes li — committed to me”.

      When the cause/goal/purpose is omitted, when we speak of “qadosh” without the “le-“, the default is the purpose for which it was created. Qadosh thus has a derived meaning of “holy” or “sacred”, which also imply committed for G-d’s Purpose.

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